The effect of vitamin D deficiency state on oxidized low-density lipoprotein alteration in patients with type 2 diabetes

Salome Sadat Salehi, Sahar Karimpour, Soghra Rabizadeh, Alireza Esteghamati, Armin Rajab, Sousan Sadat Salehi, Manouchehr Nakhjavani, Hossein Mirmiranpour

Abstract


Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and blood glucose in very low and low levels of vitamin D.

Methods: A total of 25 type-2 diabetic patients with very low serum levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (severe deficiency – <10 ng/ml); and 25 type-2 diabetic patients with low serum levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (deficient – 10 to 30 ng/ml) were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Fasting plasma glucose (FBS), postprandial glucose (PPG), HbA1C, oxLDL, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were measured. Diagnostic accuracies were determined by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and measuring the area under the curve (AUC).

Results: Patients with severe vitamin D deficiency had higher FBS, PPG, HbA1C, and oxLDL than the vitamin D deficient group (P<0.05). We showed that the AUC of FBS, PPG, HbA1C, and oxLDL were in the range of 0.7-0.9, which indicates moderate accuracies in differentiating severe vitamin D deficiency from deficiency condition.

Conclusion: In conclusion, diabetic patients with severe vitamin D deficiency had higher FBS, PPG, and oxLDL levels compared with deficient ones. ROC curve analysis of FBS, PPG, HbA1C, and oxLDL showed these markers are independent predictors of severe vitamin D deficiency and significantly discriminate between very low and low levels of vitamin D deficiency in patients with diabetes. 

Keywords: Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Vitamin D deficiency. OxLDL. Fasting blood glucose.

 


Full Text: [Abstract] [Full Article]

DOI: 10.31989/ffhd.v11i8.815

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